rkherman:

A Black-eyed Hermit Crab (Pagurus armatus) using the shell of a Lewis’s Moon Snail (Neverita lewisii).

The first image is a phantom view, and the second one is an animated gif, both showing what the hermit crab’s body looks like inside the shell.

(Apparently animated gifs is the cool thing to do, so I thought I’d see how it can enhance scientific illustration.)

Really great use of animation!

(via bioilustra)

Some more animals sketches for my weird animal alphabet. Marmoset through springhare.
Over the past week, I moved from Marina, California to Fort Collins, Colorado for internships with the Rocky Mountain Bird Observatory and ECOS Communications. It has been a hectic transition, but I am finally settling in and looking forward to starting work! Should have some new stuff up soon.

Some more animals sketches for my weird animal alphabet. Marmoset through springhare.

Over the past week, I moved from Marina, California to Fort Collins, Colorado for internships with the Rocky Mountain Bird Observatory and ECOS Communications. It has been a hectic transition, but I am finally settling in and looking forward to starting work! Should have some new stuff up soon.

Science illustration scientific illustration artists on tumblr alphabet marmoset numbat okapi pangolin quokka rosella springhare

Drawings in the RMBO Newsletter

My first freelance project for the Rocky Mountain Bird Observatory involved some quick drawings of an osprey and hummingbird.

They’ve been incorporated into their spring newsletter here.

skunkbear:

jtotheizzoe:

This week’s It’s Okay To Be Smart video is about cycles. 
This is a special one, and although you don’t get to hear my voice this week, you’ll find out about the connections between C, O, and you.
After you watch it, keep your eye out for a longer post coming up later today, explaining the beautifully simple cycles that these two atoms take through the biosphere. Watch here:


I really like It’s Okay To Be Smart's new video - beautifully, simply and symetrically exploring the cycling of oxygen and carbon. And I ain't talkin' 'bout biking! You can read a deeper explanation here.

skunkbear:

jtotheizzoe:

This week’s It’s Okay To Be Smart video is about cycles.

This is a special one, and although you don’t get to hear my voice this week, you’ll find out about the connections between C, O, and you.

After you watch it, keep your eye out for a longer post coming up later today, explaining the beautifully simple cycles that these two atoms take through the biosphere. Watch here:

I really like It’s Okay To Be Smart's new video - beautifully, simply and symetrically exploring the cycling of oxygen and carbon. And I ain't talkin' 'bout biking! You can read a deeper explanation here.

Illustration of the feeding mechanism of the sea gooseberry. When relaxed its tentacles expand, acting like a spider’s web to capture prey. Instead of stinging cells, these tentacles are lined with special adhesive cells to prevent prey from escaping. 
They had these little guys at the Monterey Bay Aquarium for a while, and I was absolutely fascinated by how much their tentacles can stretch. Really cool!

Illustration of the feeding mechanism of the sea gooseberry. When relaxed its tentacles expand, acting like a spider’s web to capture prey. Instead of stinging cells, these tentacles are lined with special adhesive cells to prevent prey from escaping. 

They had these little guys at the Monterey Bay Aquarium for a while, and I was absolutely fascinated by how much their tentacles can stretch. Really cool!

Science illustration scientific illustration artists on tumblr ctenophore Sea Gooseberry art digital art digital painting